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French Socialists heading to win parliament

Monday, June 11, 2012

President Francois Hollande’s Socialist Party and its Greens Party allies lead the first round of France’s Sunday parliamentary election. That is according to polling agencies and preliminary official results.
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­The leftist parties and their allies have therefore won more than 45 per cent of the vote, while the conservative UMP party of former president Nicolas Sarkozy took 35 per cent. The ballot was marked by low voter turnout.

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“It’s a good result tonight… but we have to remain mobilized for the second round,” said the country’s Foreign Minister, influential Socialist Laurent Fabius, as quoted by AP.

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Projections made by four polling agencies and early official results show diminished nationwide support for the conservatives. The French are angry at cost-cutting austerity measures, while the Sarkozy-era reforms are seen by some as being too friendly to the rich.

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Based on Sunday’s first round, the CSA polling institute predicted that the Socialist bloc will eventually take between 283 and 329 seats in the National Assembly – the lower house of French Parliament – out of 577 seats available. Its Green allies were set for 12 to 18 seats, suggesting that Hollande will be able to count on obtaining the 289 seats needed for an outright majority, Reuters reports.

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The same polling institute puts the conservatives on track to win 210 to 263 seats, while the far-right National Front is expected to get three.

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The Sunday vote is seen as crucial to President Hollande’s socialist agenda. The decisive second round of voting is scheduled for June 17.

 

 

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11 June, 2012,

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RT.

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French election: Socialists and allies ‘set for win

 

President Francois Hollande’s Socialists and their allies are set for a majority following the first round of voting in French legislative elections, exit polls suggest.

The Socialists appear tied with the right-wing UMP party on about 35% of the vote, but the support of Green allies gives them closer to 40%.

The outcome of the polls is expected to determine the extent and pace of reform under the newly-elected French leader.

Run-offs are to be held a week later.

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French election results continue to come in

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The French Socialist Party (FSP) and the Union for a Popular Movement (SPND) are leading the elections to the National Assembly of the Republic (France’s lower house of parliament).

According to preliminary exit polls the Socialists, along with the “green” party have gained 40% of the vote.

The center-right SPND received 35%, the far-right National Front almost 14% and the Left Radical Party 7%.

To make it to the second round, which will take place next week, parties must obtain at least 12.5% of votes.

Thus, the election marathon will continue for the socialists, the center-right and the national front.

The turnout in the first round of elections was 59% of voters.

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France elects MPs

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Over 48% of French voters have made their choice at the June 10 parliamentary election which is slightly lower than the 2007 turnout.

According to forecasts, left parties can get up to 346 seats of 577 but the ruling Socialists will hardly win the majority and, thus, will need a coalition with the Green and other leftists.

Preliminary results will be known by 10 pm Moscow time.

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French voter turnout ‘sluggish’

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French voters are casting ballots in the opening round of elections to form a new Parliament. As of midday, the turnout amounted to 21%, which is somewhat less than in the parliamentary elections of 2007.

The Socialists and the Greens are poised to win almost 350 of the 577 seats and form a governing coalition.

First counts should emerge at about 18.00 GMT.

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France holds 1st round of elections to National Assembly

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The first round of the elections to the National Assembly is underway in France, the lower house of parliament.

More than 6,500 candidates are running for 577 deputy seats in the Assembly.

The Socialists hope the current voting will seal their success on the regional elections in recent years, which allowed them to get the majority in the Senate and to confirm the vote of confidence to President Francois Hollande.

Analysts predict that Socialists are unlikely to receive the absolute majority and will have to form the coalition with “greens” and the deputies of other left parties.

TASS, IF, BBC

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