Home > NORWAY, SOCIETY > Norway – Breivik sentenced to 21 years in prison for Norway attacks

Norway – Breivik sentenced to 21 years in prison for Norway attacks

Friday, August 24, 2012

Laaska News  August  24,  2012

Ninkii Norway ku dilay 77 da qof  ee ay ku jireen labada qof ee Soomaalida ahaa 22 kii Luulyo 2011 kii,  ayaa maxkamad ku taal Magaalada Oslo ee  dalka Norway ay ku xukuntay 21 sano oo xabsi ah,ninkaas oo lagu magacaabo  Anders Breivik, wuxuuna dadkaa ku laayay laba meelood oo meeli tahay meel camp dhalinyara ah oo ku taal Utoya Island, halka meesha kalana ay ahayd xaruunta dawladda ee Oslo,  ninkaasi markuu kaamkaa dadka kulaynayay wuxuu usoo gashaday dharka Booliska, wuxuuna iskasoo dhigay qof  Boolis ah.

By:VOR

The Oslo district court delivered its verdict in the case of the so-called Norwegian shooter, Anders Breivik. 77 people died in Breivik’s dual terrorist attacks in Oslo’s government quarter and at a youth camp on Utoya Island on July 22nd last year.

.

Live update, Moscow time.

.
16:35 Psychiatrists have made clear that the crime itself should not impact the determination of psychosis.

 

.

16:32 Psychosis is determined by the way psychiatrists define psychosis. Currently, that means a lack of emotional and mental control, while intellectual functions may be intact. It involves a lack of capacity to respond appropriately to external occurrences. The key criterion of psychosis is the defendant’s inability to make a realistic assessment of his own connection with reality.

.

16:31 The judge is describing criminal insanity as prescribed by the Criminal Code. The concept of insanity was replaced by psychotic. A person who was psychotic at the time of the commission of the act shall not be deemed responsible for their crimes.

.

16:30 The hearing has resumed.

 

 

16:10 Judge Lund has called a 15-minute recess, after which the question of Breivik’s sanity will be discussed.

 

 

16:09 Judge Lund is now addressing Breivik’s acquittal claim. The claim is inadmissible.

 

 

16:08 The court finds it has been proven behind any reasonable doubt that Breivik had the appropriate mens rea as described in the criminal code.

 

 

16:08 The intentions behind both terrorist act was to provoke fear throughout society. He further intended to derail governmental function.

16:06 The court notes that a determination of whether attempted crimes can be considered primary crimes in this case is irrelevant.

16:05 The court interprets the indictment as having featured attempted murder as part of the overall terrorist act.

 

 

16:04 Breivik describes having carefully planned the Utoya massacre, and the attempted murders were carried out according to a premeditated plan. They were conducted in a particularly cruel way, and thus under aggravating circumstances.

 

 

16:02 The court thus holds that charges in the indictment relating to the Utoya murders were satisfied.

 

.

16:01 Likewise, the Utoya Massacre was well planned. The defendant described his numerous gunshots at victims as security shots, to ensure that the victims were killed. He has admitted that his original plan was to scare as many of the youths as possible into the water causing mass drownings, in order to use the water “as a method of mass destruction.”

 

.

16:00 With regard to the government district, Breivik has admitted to the actions giving rise to the charges. He admitted that he intended all of the murders in the government district with premeditation. These murders were carried out under aggravating circumstances and in a particularly cruel manner.

 

.

15:56 Terror intent requires a defendant to have been reasonably sure that his act would disrupt a function of vital importance to society, and the intent must be to effect such disruption in a serious capacity, with an eye to the severity and long-term nature of this disruption.

 

.

15:53 The court will now describe the legal bases of its sentencing decision. He explains that acts of terrorism are punishable by upwards of 21 years when they are carried out with specific intent.

 

.

15:51 The testimony of one survivor describes having seen a young boy screaming to Breivik that his dad had been killed, and she assumed that police had arrived. She was then shot in the stomach.

 

.
15:47 Judge Lund has described several accounts where while pairs of best friends attempted to escape together, one was shot dead and the other survived. In one case, the murder victim’s body collapsed onto the survivor.

 

.
15:45 He describes one survivor’s testimony, which recounts having watched a girl approach the uniformed defendant. The defendant turned to her and shot her at close range. The victim then ran into the water. The defendant stood on the shore yelling that he would kill all of those swimming to escape. The victim describes Breivik’s face as having turned red, and his voice as having cracked as he screamed that he would kill them all.

 

.
15:43 Judge Lund is describing the treatment these victims have undergone since the incident. Many were hospitalized for months after the massacre, and many are still receiving treatment.

 

.
15:39 According to the judge’s accounts, many of those who survived did so by sheer luck. Some played dead, and others hid after having been shot.

 

.
15:35 Breivik’s face remains emotionless as the judge details the removal of portions of the muscles of one of his young victims.

 

.
15:30 Many of those present in the courtroom are describing the atmosphere as depressing. Some of those present are in tears as they listen to the judge’s account of the unthinkable details of the Utoya Island ordeal.

 

 

.
15:26 He describes a scene upon the arrival of the police officers where victims who had survived gunshot wounds thought that the real police officers were working with Breivik. Upon their arrival, gunshot wound survivors feared for their lives.

 

.

15:23 The judge describes one victim who was shot. Afterward, Breivik approached him and asked in a kindly voice whether he had seen the gunman. The victim sensed that it was a set up and dove into the water. Breivik then shot at him from the surface, hitting him again.

 

.
15:20 The judge describes a victim who attemtped to protect his girlfriend from gunfire in a small cafe. His girlfriend was killed. He survived a gunshot wound to the face, and has been mostly unable to work since the incident.

 

.
15:17 Breivik remains calm as the judge describes these horrifying accounts.

 

.
15:14 The judge is continuing to recount details of injuries sustained by survivors of the attack on Utoya Island.

 

.
15:07 The judge is describing chaotic scenes of youths running from Breivik as he shot at them. According to the judge, Breivik shot at nearly every person he saw.

 

.

15:05 Court is back in session. The judges will now describe each of the attempted murder counts. The judge explains that it was Breivik’s goal to kill everyone at Utoya. With a few exceptions, he shot everyone he saw.

 

.

14:54 Norway mass killer Anders Behring Breivik will not appeal an Oslo court’s verdict on Friday finding him sane and sending him to prison for 21 years, his lawyer said after the conviction was handed down. “He says he won’t appeal now that he has been found sane,” Geir Lippestad told journalists outside the courtroom during a break in the proceedings.

 

.
14:27 Director of the Moscow Bureau for Human Rights Alexander Brod stated to the Russian Agency for legal and judicial information: “He [Breivik] committed a misanthropic crime, guided by racist motives among others. I am confused by the fact that, as it was shown on TV, his prison cell looks like a good hotel apartment. That is, he has a computer, and training simulators, and all living conditions there. Of course, serving thesentence of 21 years in such a comfortable place is the supreme manifestation of humanism. I think that humanism has exceeded all possible expectations”.

 

.

14:19 The hearing has been adjourned until 13:00 Oslo time/15:00 Moscow time (GMT +4).

 

 

.

14:19 He was arrested finally at 18:34 on Utoya Island.

 

.

14:18  Two victims died while trying to escape Breivik. One victim drowned while trying to swim away, and another died from a fall off a cliff.

 

.

14:15  At 18:24, he placed another call to the police, again offering to surrender. He then carried on shooting.

 

.

14:12  Breivik appears disinterested as the judge describes his actions at that particular scene. His eyes are darting around shiftily and he’s sipping from a mug in front of him.

 

.

14:10  The defendant then approached a group of victims, told them he was a police officer, and offered to transport them to safety. When one youth asked for identification, he began firing. He killed 14 youths at the scene.

 

.

14:07  Notably, the defendant called the police at 18:00, stating that he was willing to give himself up. This means after 39 minutes of shooting, the defendant was willing to voluntarily stopped and called the relevant authorities to do so. As noted earlier, police would not arrive for another 34 minutes. He then proceeded to kill eight youths who had gathered by the shore. The judge is now describing each of those murders.

 

.

14:06  He then fired on both a school house and a boat filled with youths attempting to escape. Fortunately, he did not kill anyone in these attempts.

.

14:05  He then attacked a group of youths he discovered hiding in the forest nearby.

.

14:03 He then found several youths hiding between Lovers Path and the shore. He shot and killed most of them, sustaining the trends of numerous gun shots at each victim, including gunshots to the head in most cases.

.

13:59  He then went to “Lovers Path,” a pathway where he killed 15 people, including 10 of 11 youths lying together in a cluster. He tried to confuse the youths there by asking them where the perpetrator was. As with the previous scenes described, he seems to have shot each of his victims no less than twice. He shot most, if not all, of those on Lovers Path in the head.

.

13:56  The judge is now describing a similar scene in a larger nearby corridor. As with the previous scene, none of the youths killed seem to have been shot only once. He left the corridor and then re-entered in order to kill one last person, shooting him several times.

.

13:52 The judge is describing a scene in a corridor where seven youth campers were shot dead, and where many others fled or hid behind a piano to avoid being seen.

 

.

13:49 Each victim the judge has described so far was shot numerous times to vital zones, such as the head, chest, and abdomen. Most described so far died instantly.

 

.

13:47 After the shooting began, a camp resident shouted from within a window to inquire as to what Breivik was doing. He said he was a police officer and was there to protect them and urged them to come outside. He then killed them.

 

.

13:46 A security guard was shot five times in the head, chest, abdomen, and back.

 

.

13:45   The first murders were committed around 17:21. The first two victims were killed instantly by numerous gunshot wounds.

 

.

13:43   The judge will now describe each of the murders that Breivik has been charged with.

 

.

13:42  Local residents attempted to rescue the campers, and some of them were shot at in the process as well.

 

.

13:41 The judge is describing the mental damages that have pervaded among camp inhabitants in the aftermath of the attack.

 

.

13:39 Shortly before he shot and killed his first victim, the camp residents had been informed of the government bombing. When shots were fired, panic engulfed the camp.

 

.

13:38   He was not apprehended by police until 18:34. He used the intervening period to fire at the camp inhabitants. He killed 67 people by gunfire, and two others died while fleeing.

.

13:37  He brought with him a semi-automatic rifle, a pistol, ammunition, smoke grenades, and other equipment. He arrived at 17:17.

 

.

13:36  Before entering Utoya Island, he exchanged his bullet-proof vest for a vest filled with ammunition. When entering Utoya Island, he showed his police identification. Security allowed him to pass. He was asked to cover up his rifle. He carried a long box.

.

13:35 The judge is now going to discuss the events at Utoya Island. Breivik thought that his explosion had failed, and decided to kill everyone he could at the ruling Labor Party’s Utoya Island-based summer youth camp

..

13:32  The judge is now describing the consequence that the attacks had on the work of the government. In order to sustain government function in the aftermath of the explosion, a great deal of budgetary funds had to be spent on temporary facilities, etc.

 

.

13:23 The court is detailing devastating wounds and injuries, resulting in numerous operations, scars, and at least one amputation.

.

13:21 Breivik has re-entered the court chatting with his lawyers, looking very calm and impassive.

.

13:20 We are back in session. Nine people were seriously injured in the government explosion. All but two testified in court, and those two provided testimony to be read in court. The court will now go into detail on the physical injuries. They will not detail the psychological difficulties resulting from the attack on behalf of these victims, but they note that such difficulties are serious.

.

13:10 First reaction to the Breivik sentence from Russia: the head of the Moscow Chamber of Attorneys Henry Reznik said that the Norwegian court’s verdict indicates the “victory of legality over emotions”. “I consider the events after the atrocities as the victory of civilization and real democracy over spontaneous reaction on what had happened. The country does not sacrifice the rule of law to emotions”, said Reznik. And he added that Russia “should learn this from Norway, and should not be tempted to cancel the moratorium on the death penalty.”

 

.
13:06 After the break, the court is expected to announce why they’ve determined that Breivik is of sound mind. Breivik must be thrilled at the finding. He has made his faith in his own sanity clear throughout the course of the trial. And in a letter to Norwegian tabloid Verdans Gang, he lamented that being placed in a psych ward – the consequence if he’d been found insane – would have been a “fate worse than death.”

 

.

12:58 The judge announced a 15-minute break.

 

.

12:57 The eighth, not a government employee, who was passing through the area on her way home from work, died immediately of massive injuries to the head and throat caused by the shockwave and splints and objects that hit him.

.

12:56 The seventh was a restaurant owner who was coincidentally passing by, died immediately of massive injuries to the head and body caused by the shockwave and splints and objects that hit him.

.

12:55 The sixth, died immediately of massive injuries to the head and body caused by the shockwave and splints and objects that hit her. The fifth, died immediately by excessive injuries to the chest and abdomen due to splints that hit her.

.

12:54 The fourth, an employee of the Office of the Prime Minister, was killed by splints that hit her neck as a result of the explosion. The third was entering a government building and was killed immediately on impact.

.

12:53 The second, who worked for the Justice Ministry’s international department, was killed instantly by splints caused by the explosion.

.

12:52  The first, a Justice Ministry official was on holiday, but had stopped by the office to drop off a manuscript at the worst possible time. He was killed by the bomb instantly.

.

12:51 The court will now give an account of each individual murder.

.

12:50 The attack has fostered mental issues among many victims. Post-traumatic stress disorder, depression, and various types of anxiety disorders are among the psychological ailments that may be expected as a result of the trauma.

.

12:49 Dead and injured people were found both inside and outside the buildings. Many injured people managed to escape the buildings, but search and rescue work was made difficult due to the extensive damages.

12:48 Several government buildings were completely destroyed by the bomb, especially those surrounding the blast. None collapsed, fortunately.

12:47 The explosion occurred at 15:25. Eight people were killed, and many were injured – including several who were injured seriously.

12:46 Closed-circuit television footage shows Breivik parking near the central Oslo bomb compound. He lit a fuse with an approximately seven-minute burn time, and then left on foot toward his getaway car. He was wearing a uniform that looked like the local police uniform. He had a pistol in a holster on his thigh.

12:45 The judges will now discuss the terrorist attack.

12:43 He meditated in order to de-emotionalize himself. Breivik says it was the same technique used by Japanese warriors. This meditation technique involved a mix of visualization and soundtrack music.

12:40 He took three courses of anabolic steroids in the leadup to the attack. He took a stimulant in the days leading to the attack. The stimulant was a mix of caffeine, ephederine, and aspirin. He practiced shooting at a shooting range.

12:37 The morning of the attack, he paid a parking ticket and uploaded the film: Knights Templar 2083: movie trailer on two websites. He explained that the film was a short version of the manifesto. He then attempted to send it to more than 8,000 emails. It was received by at least 958 of those.

12:36 The night before the attack, he stayed at his mother’s apartment in Oslo. That night, he prepared to distribute his manifesto.

12:35 The bomb was made by Breivik from a mix of chemical fertilizer, diesel, and aluminum. 43 purchases between September 2010-July 2011 linked to the manufacture of the bomb.

12:33 Two rifles, one pistol, one shotgun, and ammunition were purchased to carry out his attacks. Police have identified 22 purchases linked to the weapons, mostly between May 2010-June 2011. He established a company earlier on, likely as a means of puchasing equipment for the bomb detonated in downtown Oslo. He also rented a farm in order to build the bomb.

12:31 Breivik drained his bank accounts and used ten credit cards in order to fund the attacks.

12:30 A new judge will now discuss Breivik’s preparations for the attack.

12:29 Breivik believes the UN Declaration on Human Rights grants him the right to kill in order to preserve his culture.

12:28 By way of his role in the Knights Templar, he has granted himself license to kill in order to save his people.

12:27 Breivik believes women should not work, but rather should devote their lives to reproducing ethnic Norwegian babies.

12:26 The judge will now discuss Breivik’s political views. He believes ethnic Norwegians are in the process of being exterminated, and that the ruling Labor Party is responsible for this insofar as their rule has fostered multiculturalism in Norway. He believes these multiculturalism endeavors are kept clandestine by the government and the media. He attributes this to a Marxist cultural revolution.

12:25 The court has found no basis on which to believe in the existence of the Knights Templar. This will be touched on in the discussion of his sanity.

12:24 The Knights Templar establishes its own standards of justice, to the extent of deciding who should be killed.

12:23 Breivik claims that the Knights Templar consists of members from many different countries. He has stated that it is a network of militant nationalist activists.

12:22 Breivik claims that NATO’s intervention in Serbia in defense of Kosovo was the “straw that broke the camel’s back.” He claims that his trip to Liberia was actually intended to facilitate a meeting between him and a Serb nationalist, rather than to purchase blood diamonds.

12:20 The judge will discuss the Knights Templar- a group to which Breivik has claimed membership since his arrest. His connection with the group has been key to questions of Breivik’s sanity. Whether the group exists is questionable. The court questioned whether the group was a product of his delusion.

12:19 The manifesto depicts Islam as a violence-oriented ideology. Breivik distributed a manifesto just before the terrorist attacks, under the pseudonym Andrew Breivik. He appears to have started on the manifesto, 1,500 pages long, in 2007 and was written in English. He stated that the year 2083 would commemorate the 400th anniversary of the Battle of Vienna. His manifesto is divided into three parts – the history of Europe, his ideology and breaking down his preparations for the terrorist attacks.

12:17 The judge will now discuss the events leading to the terrorist attack. She is discussing the manifesto that he published in the days leading to the attack. It is called 2083: A Declaration of European Independence and can be found in full online.

12:15 Trygve Sorvaag, a Norwegian freelance journalist covering for Sky News, says Breivik will speak and comment in about six hours, around 5pm BST (8pm MT).

12:12 Judge Arntzen is now reading the verdict, which will take a few hours.

12:11 The judge is describing a telecommunications job Breivik held, where he was promoted to team leader. During that time, he founded and ran various types of companies, including a number of unsuccessful ones. Interestingly, he purchased raw diamonds in Libya as part of one such business initiative.

12:09 Court has reverted to 2006 onward on the question of criminal sanity.

12:07 The judge is reading a biography of Breivik’s life, describing his childhood in detail.

12:05 Judge Arntzen asks all to rise for the rise. She says it is unanimous. Breivik has been found sane and sentenced to 21 years in prison, with 445 days deducted for his time in custody.

12:00 The panel of five judges have arrived, led by Wenche Elizabeth Arntzen. Breivik’s handcuffs are removed and he gives his customary far-Right salute. The hearing has begun.

11:58 Anders Behring Breivik has arrived in court. He looks relatively confident, even smiling and chatting with his defence lawyer. Remember, if he is declared insane, he will immediately appeal.

11:45 The courtroom is full with 15 minutes to go before proceedings begin.
11:43 Breivik has arrived at the courthouse. An armored vehicle arrived through a special tunnel at the back door. Dozens of police cars are surrounding the courthouse.

11:35 The main players have arrived in court. Journalists are trying to sort out what sentence will be handed down. So far no one dares guess what to expect, but everyone hopes the verdict will be well balanced.

Verdict upon Breivik will be passed on Friday, 24 August (Oslo time)

08.30: Beginning of the broadcast from the Oslo District Court, NRK 1 TV Channel

10.00: Beginning of the hearings in Court Hall #250.Judge Wenche Elizabeth Arntzen starts reading the sentence 2-3 minutes after the beginning.

11.20: 20-minute break

12.30: Break for lunch.

14.40: Break

15.45: Break

16.00: End of the hearings; Breivik will possibly state his last plea

16.30: Press-conference

The prosecutors want the court to find Breivik insane and send him to coercive treatment, while his lawyers insist that their defendant should be found to be sane and be given a maximally lenient sentence.

Breivik says he is prepared to serve his prison term (no more than 21years under Norwegian law) and strongly objects to coercive treatment.

The judges will start reading out the sentence at midday Moscow time, and it will take them 5 to 6 hours. The court meeting will be covered live by TV channels.

If found sane, Breivik will return to his relatively spacious cells, enjoying the comforts of a computer, newspapers and a separate exercise room.

Although the maximum sentence is 21 years, prisoners can be held indefinitely if deemed dangerous and few believe anyone would ever sign Breivik’s release papers.

If declared insane, Breivik faces a regime of indefinite mental treatments inside a one-man mental ward set up for him in the prison and would come up for review every three years.

One team of court appointed psychiatrists concluded he was psychotic while another came to the opposite conclusion. To make the ruling more difficult, several other experts who testified described a series of mental conditions Breivik suffered from.

Still, polls show that around 70 percent of Norwegians think such a well-planned attack could not have been the work of a madman and Breivik must take responsibility rather than be dismissed as merely deranged.

Breivik himself argued for a verdict of sanity as he wants the attack to be seen as a political statement rather than an act of lunacy.

If Breivik appeals, he will be granted a new, possibly even longer trial sometime in January.

Three special regime prisons waiting for Breivik

Three special regime prisons are being prepared for Breivik in Norway, where he can be placed if convicted, – NRK TV Company reported today.

“Three prisons – Ila, Skien and Rinnerike – should be ready for Breivik on a tight timetable”, – a representative of Norway’s Ministry of Justice Andreal Shulbergsaid. Ila will be the main place ofBreivik’s imprisonment, the other two will be alternative options. Flights will be banned in the air space over the prisons for the years to come, and the internal security will be strengthened.

It is already known that whatever the outcome Breivik will be placed in one of the blocks of the Ila prison.

77 people were killed in the double terrorist act committed by Breivik in the government quarter of Oslo and the Norwegian Labor Party youth camp on the Utoya Island on July 22, 2011.

Norway judges to rule on Breivik

A Norwegian court is due to deliver its verdict in the trial of mass killer Anders Behring Breivik.

The panel of five trial judges will have to rule on Breivik’s sanity when they deliver their verdict. Their conclusion will determine whether he is given a long prison sentence or sent to a secure psychiatric ward.

On Thursday, security barriers were put up outside the Oslo district court ahead of Friday’s sentence reading.

A glass partition will separate Breivik from relatives of victims in a courtroom custom-built for the trial.

Remote-controlled cameras will film the proceedings, sending the images to courtrooms around Norway where other relatives will watch the hearing live.
Breivik, 33, who insists he is sane, has refused to plead guilty and has sought to justify his attacks by saying they were necessary to stop the “Islamisation” of Norway.

Prosecutors have called for him to be considered insane.

AFP, TASS, BBC, rapsinews.ru, telegraph.uk

About these ads